Life in my Shoes

Life in my Shoes

Friday, February 6, 2015

Mommy, where are they? {Part 5}

Our neighbor's children were home.
But not all of them.
CPS still had oversight of their education.
They were being forced to put them in public school.
Their lives had been turned upside down unnecessarily, and a sibling of two of their adopted children {who they had been in the process of adopting as well} was still left by herself in a foster home.

To read the details of this story, go here.

Those in our community had had enough!


At what point in our country's history did it become acceptable for outside agencies to raid homes without warning, take children hostage, put them in stranger's homes (which we've all heard the horror stories of children being molested and abused in those homes as well), take them to unfamiliar doctors for examinations, force them to take academic tests which the children know if they fail will be bad news for all (no pressure there!), and force them to go to public school where they know no one, nor do they even know how a day there works because they've only ever known homeschooling??
When did it become the norm of our society that parents are guilty until proven innocent and you won't ever be proven innocent because your lifestyle is much more conservative and radical than mainstream society?
When did "different" or "unique" start to equate with "wrong" or "unsafe?"
When did parents become in danger of losing all their rights and freedoms to raise their families as they choose or deem best for their situation regardless of whether or not it seemed different from what other people "normally" do?
I'm not talking about criminal behavior here.
I'm referring to loving people who have had a track record of openness and success in caring for and educating their own (and others) children.

Tim Lambert of the Texas Homeschool Coalition completely agreed with us.
He started making phone calls and writing letters.
He met with a group of us in a little restaurant in downtown Dallas within walking distance of the courthouse, and we formulated a plan for calling these agencies into accountability.
Would it restore the Tutt family to what it had been previously?
Would it reimburse the Tutt family for the huge financial burden this situation had become?
Would it remove the scars of the trauma the children will bear for the rest of their lives?
Absolutely not.

But we couldn't just sit around and do nothing.
That's how abuse is perpetuated.
By silence.
And darkness.

We wanted to throw open the windows and shed some light on this situation.
And speak up.
While we still have a voice in America.

It was all captured on film.

You can view that video here.

You can see my personal comments in the first video at the 6:00 minute mark and in the second video at the 7:26 mark.




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